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D-ST 72717 - Advanced Creative Process: Postmodern
A reaction to the compositional and presentational constraints of historic modern dance, postmodern dance employed everyday movement as valid performance art, advocated novel compositional methods and recognized that any movement could be dance and any mover could be a dancer. The work of artists like Trisha Brown, Simone Forti, Anna Halprin, Steve Paxton and Yvonne Rainer explored the idea that movement arises from internal sensation, that responses to stimuli don’t need to be prepared for – they are already there in the body. These artists explored everyday movement (walking, bending, carrying) and through them the fundamentals of motion – weight, verticality, speed, rhythm, direction, level, balance. In the process, they moved away from psychology, expressivity and traditional narrative to explore experiential data. Employing improvisation, chance procedures, and written scores, they investigated movement. Many of these artists attended Robert Dunn’s composition classes, between 1960 and 1962. Dunn had been a student of John Cage. Dunn encouraged participants to use constraints or predetermined rules to produce new choreography. This class is an opportunity to develop scores/rules and formats of your own.

Lecture
Description A reaction to the compositional and presentational constraints of historic modern dance, postmodern dance employed everyday movement as valid performance art, advocated novel compositional methods and recognized that any movement could be dance and any mover could be a dancer. The work of artists like Trisha Brown, Simone Forti, Anna Halprin, Steve Paxton and Yvonne Rainer explored the idea that movement arises from internal sensation, that responses to stimuli don’t need to be prepared for – they are already there in the body. These artists explored everyday movement (walking, bending, carrying) and through them the fundamentals of motion – weight, verticality, speed, rhythm, direction, level, balance. In the process, they moved away from psychology, expressivity and traditional narrative to explore experiential data. Employing improvisation, chance procedures, and written scores, they investigated movement. Many of these artists attended Robert Dunn’s composition classes, between 1960 and 1962. Dunn had been a student of John Cage. Dunn encouraged participants to use constraints or predetermined rules to produce new choreography. This class is an opportunity to develop scores/rules and formats of your own.
Prerequisites D-ST 2205 / Lecture <min credit = 1.50> or DA 265 / Lecture <min credit = 1.50>
Corequisites N/A
Fees N/A
Credits 1.50
Credit Types Credit

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